Renting with pets? Landlords might be OK with that.

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Renting with pets? Landlords might be OK with that.

Our 2014 Tenants and Sharers report found that despite tenants believing the biggest disadvantage to renting is not being able to find a pet-friendly property, landlords are open to accepting pets if tenants paid slightly more rent.

Australian renters notoriously struggle to find pet-friendly rentals, and it’s always a hot topic of conversation in our monthly #propchat on Twitter.

Our annual report confirmed that one of the biggest pain points for renters (and what often makes them start looking for a place to buy), is the inability to live with their furry family members.

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According to the Australian Bureau of Statistics, 2.16 million renting families are pet owners. Yet, landlords are reluctant to advertise a property as welcoming to pets off the bat, and many people assume that the landlord or the property manager will automatically reject requests for pets.

The good news – our research reveals that landlords and property managers can actually be quite flexible when it comes to bringing your furry friend into the property. Renters who asked the question found landlords were willing to let them have a pet – if – they paid extra and were willing to take some additional measures, like pet references or insurance. Four in five landlords would consider allowing pets for more rent.

Landlords that do allow pets can find themselves at a competitive advantage. And because pet owners often have a hard time finding a place to rent, they tend to stay put and be very loyal, making great tenants.

Four in five landlords would consider allowing pets for more rent

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Start a conversation

So if you want to let with your pet, we recommend asking, even if there’s no pet-friendly signs. Just because a property isn’t marketed as pet friendly doesn’t mean the landlord won’t let you bring those family members along with a few concessions.

Not all landlords will be able to say yes to pets. A landlord’s first obligation is the maintenance of the property – and some properties just aren’t compatible to share with animals. But with renters starting to have success by kicking off the conversation, we think it’s worth asking!

originally posted on realestate.com.au

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